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Read current monthly newsletter articles from ecological professionals or browse through our archived newsletters.

Reducing Invasive Plants and Recovering a Healthy Plant Community

Reducing Invasive Plants and Recovering a Healthy Plant Community

By Ellen Snyder

In southeastern New Hampshire, where I work with landowners and communities on land stewardship, managing invasive plants is a constant struggle. As the Land Stewardship Coordinator for the Town of Durham, I’m guiding three restoration projects on town conservation land. It was hard not to be overwhelmed by the pervasiveness of invasive plants on all three properties. To avoid invasive paralysis, I keep my focus on the goal: restoration of a place to a mostly self-sustaining, healthy plant community.  The reward is a restored landscape brimming with native plants and native beneficial insects. 

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Dodder, a Parasitic Vine Weed

Dodder, a Parasitic Vine Weed

By Bruce Wenning

Not all plant diseases are caused by parasitic microbes, some are caused by parasitic weeds.  The dodder vine is one of those weeds.  Dodder attaches itself to healthy plants and makes them more vulnerable to other diseases and insect pests. Find out all about the dodder lifecycle and best practices for ridding your landscape of this fascinating but noxious vine.

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How to Identify and Respond to Pests at Home

How to Identify and Respond to Pests at Home

By Emily May

One of the most fulfilling aspects of spending most of my time at home over the past few months has been watching the flowers in my yard blossom and buzz with bees, flies, butterflies, hummingbirds, and more. I also notice when things go awry, like when I spotted deformed flower heads on my bee balm (Monarda fistulosa) and later on my purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea). What was going on and what could I do about it without the use of harmful pesticides which pose risk to both humans and insects alike. 

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Carpenter Bees at Work in Home and Garden

Carpenter Bees at Work in Home and Garden

By Karen Boussolini 

Bees are smart. They recognize high-quality food and habitat. The buzz has gone out that my house is a happening place for carpenter bees. In a quest to rid my house of carpenter bees, understand their life cycle, and find alternatives that don’t involve them eating my house I discovered some simple steps to save both my house and these gentle beneficial insects. 

 

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Alexandra Botanic Gardens of Wellesley College: Sheet Mulching Update

Alexandra Botanic Gardens of Wellesley College: Sheet Mulching Update

By Tricia Diggins

Ten years ago I wrote an article about sheet mulching that highlighted a project in the Alexandra Botanic Gardens of Wellesley College. It was so interesting to revisit the project ten years later and to see if the sheet mulching solution stood the test of time and kept the turfgrass at bay. One of the unexpected benefits of smothering the turfgrass was that it allowed native plants to naturally form a thriving plant community.  

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ELA News

ELA News – September 2020

ELA News – September 2020

Learn about upcoming programs and find out what’s happening within the organization.

  • Early Discounts for Fall Conferences
  • Member Engagement Initiative
  • Share at Volunteer Coffee
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ELA News – July 2020

ELA News – July 2020

Learn about upcoming programs and find out what’s happening within the organization.

  • ELA Welcomes New Board
  • Your Skills Needed
  • Webinar Access Remains Free through August
  • Volunteer Coffee Returns
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Gleanings

Archived Newsletters

You do a wonderful job with your newsletters. Everything might as well be a MUST Do with the way you present the programs.  We appreciate your dedication to doing a good job, and are most impressed with ELA.

Ginny S. Talbot Ecological Land Care

I really love ELA. Can't believe I only discovered y'all last year!

Laura B

Can I just say I have enjoyed all the lectures, conferences, classes and tours put on by ELA. You are doing a fabulous job. Thank you so much for all the work you put into this really incredible resource.

Georgia H

I am an avid consumer of your web information and webinars. Keep up the excellent work!

Judy P. Connecticut Sea Grant

THANKS FOR THIS WEBINAR EVENT -- and to the author for the links to the Rodale Institute. To-the-point, compact (but not compacted!), memorable and motivating!

Joeth B.

I just wanted to let you know I thought the conference was fantastic. It was so informative and the speakers where great! Thanks so much.

Kim H. Kim Hoyt Architect & Landscape Architect P.C.