Archive | Stormwater Management

The Green Alley, the Water Table, and the Ostrich

by Heather Heimarck Boston Architectural College’s “Green Alley” was built with the intention of creating a replicable model that would ameliorate negative environmental impacts caused by urban streets and high building density. Cities lack porous surfaces to return stormwater into the ground due to road, rooftops and sidewalks built with non-absorptive or impervious surfaces. The […]

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Good Medicine: The Benefits of Green Infrastructure

by Thomas Benjamin The evolution of Kent Hospital’s Sustainable Campus Landscape Initiative was both capital project and Master Plan driven. In the early 2000s, Kent, located in Warwick, RI, embarked on planning major upgrades to the Emergency Department and Emergency Room, including a 1,393 square meters +/- (15,000 square-foot) Women’s Imaging Center addition, substantial new […]

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Native Plant Selection for Biofilters and Rain Gardens

by Catherine Neal Modern storm water management systems rely on vegetation to hold the soil, filter contaminants, absorb nutrients, intercept and transpire water, and support healthy and diverse soil biology. Engineers are only beginning to appreciate the contribution that landscapers can make to help green infrastructure survive and thrive. Selecting appropriate plants for biofilters, bioswales, […]

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Practical Application of Tree Filter Systems

by Paul Iorio I recently brought to completion a large parking lot project that illustrates the applications as well as adaptability of tree filter systems in an urban environment. Tree filter systems integrate common street trees with stormwater collection to achieve a viable and sustainable alternative to a traditional “end of pipe” system, while still […]

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Utilizing Natural Systems and Bringing Groups Together to Clean Up Lake George

by Randy Rath One of the biggest threats to the water quality of many lakes – including Lake George in upstate New York – is stormwater runoff. After a storm, water that falls on soil can infiltrate down into the ground and eventually make its way into the groundwater. Water that falls on impervious surfaces, […]

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Encouraging Citizen Action to Soak Up the Rain

by Anne Leiby and Cindy Brown Stormwater runoff is a significant source of water pollution in the United States. As rain falls onto hard surfaces, such as roofs, roads, parking lots, sidewalks, and hard-packed grass, it picks up and carries with it a variety of pollutants including bacteria, heavy metals, nutrients, and sediment. These pollutants […]

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