Archive | Disease and Pests Management

Drought and Pests

by Heather Faubert Two general statements about droughts, insects, and diseases hold true: Most plant-feeding insects tend to survive very well under drought conditions. Plant diseases are not very troublesome during droughts. All insects can acquire various fungal disease and these diseases generally need high humidity. Similarly, most plant diseases need rain or at least […]

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Rose Insect Pest Alert: The Roseslug Sawfly, Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae

by Bruce Wenning Sawfly insects are in the order Hymenoptera that includes bees, ants, wasps, parasitic wasps, and sawflies. Metamorphosis is complete: egg, larva, pupa, adult (Borror, Triplehorn and Johnson, 1989). Sawfly larvae differ from larvae in the order Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) by lacking noticeable body hairs, having a well-developed head, and possessing more […]

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Garden Insect Primer: Getting to Know Common Garden Insect Pest Groups and their Associated Signs of Plant Damage

by Bruce Wenning There are 31 orders of insects, but of those only 11 orders contain economically important pests of trees, shrubs, garden plants, lawns, vegetable crops, wood, and fiber. Most of the insect damage caused to garden plants plaguing garden maintenance people and garden designers are concentrated in just seven orders. (more…)

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The Emerald Ash Borer: Information about the Ash Tree Killer and other “Boring” Beetles

by Bruce Wenning It is important for ecological landscaping professionals to know the differences between various insect pests and non-pests. Most can recognize common insects such as bees, wasps, butterflies, dragonflies, ants, scale insects, aphids, and perhaps a few others. Everyone knows what spiders look like and understand that spiders are beneficial garden arthropods. Correctly […]

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The Scoop on Dog Waste

by Maureen Sundberg As the piles of snow finally melt from lawns and garden beds in spring, we’re often confronted with the waste left behind by winter dog walkers. At the least, these surprise packages are a messy annoyance. With an estimated 70 to 80 million dogs in the United States, uncollected dog waste also […]

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