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Edible Landscaping

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Designing Gardens Accessible to All

by Rachel Lindsay

An accessible landscape provides not just access but varied experiences to all visitors. Ecological designers take the concept of universal design even farther and consider how the landscape, especially public and participatory gardens, can benefit not just people of all abilities, but also wildlife, pollinators, soil microorganisms, and watersheds.

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Planting Edible Native Species – A Case Study from Massachusetts

by Russ Cohen

A newly daylighted stream at Willard’s Woods in Lexington, MA presented a serendipitous opportunity for introduction of edible native plants to the conservation area. At a double session focused on propagating and planting edible native plant species, Russ Cohen and co-presenter Georgia Hann included this 2017 project at ELA’s 2020 Conference & Eco-Marketplace in March. Here, Russ follows up the conference session with a deeper dive into the Willard’s Woods project.

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Edible Plantings in the Built Landscape

Surrounded by uncertainty, more people are thinking about how their landscapes can provide food. Lawns are yielding to vegetable gardens, and suppliers of chicks have struggled to keep up with demand. For those who don’t want to take on the responsibility of a new garden or chickens, we asked a couple of ELA members to share how they introduce edible plants into the landscape.

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Mixing It Up – Can Edibles and Ornamentals Get Along in a Designed Garden?

by Ellen Sousa Many people love the idea of including functional plants (edibles and herbs) in ornamental plantings, but in reality it’s not always easy to achieve an acceptable aesthetic without careful design, plant selection, and attention to each plant’s growth habit and needs. Vegetable gardens tend toward the messy side, and popular fruit and…

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